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Showing posts from October, 2010

Searching for a needle in a needle-stack

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Whole-genome sequencing is a game-changer for human genetics. It is now possible to deduce every base of an individual’s genome (all 6 billion of them – two copies of 3 billion each) for a couple of thousand euros, and dropping. (Yes, euros). Even Ozzy Osbourne just got his genome sequenced! For researchers searching for the causes of genetic disease (or resistance to vast quantities of drugs and alcohol), this means they no longer have to infer where a mutation is by tracking a sampling of “markers” spaced across the genome – they can directly see all of the genetic information.

The problem is, they directly see all of the genetic information. If each of us carries thousands of mutations – changes that are very rare or may even have never been seen before in any other person – then telling which one of those changes is actually causing the condition is a tough task. Researchers in psychiatric genetics are currently grappling with how to handle this glut of information.

The pr…

Colour my world

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Colour does not exist. Not out in the world at any rate. All that exists in the world is a smooth continuum of light of different wavelengths. Colour is a construction of our brains. A lot is known about how the brain does this, beginning with complicated circuits in the retina itself. Thanks to a new paper from Greg Field and colleagues we now have an even more detailed picture of how retinal circuits are wired to enable light to be categorized into different colours. This study illustrates a dramatic and fundamental principle of brain wiring – namely that cells that fire together, wire together.

Colour discrimination begins with the absorption of light of different wavelengths. This is accomplished by photopigment proteins, called opsins, which are expressed in cone photoreceptor cells in the retina. Humans have three opsin genes, which encode proteins that preferentially absorb light of different wavelengths: short (S, in what we perceive as the blue part of the spectrum),…

Mice with fully functioning human brains

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I wouldn’t usually discuss politics in a blog like this, but a recent story caught my eye, as it provides an example of the depressing and sometimes bizarre level of scientific illiteracy among elected officials or some people who hope to be elected. The example is from the United States, which is an easy target in this regard, but we have had a similar episode in Ireland recently so I don’t think we (or indeed any other non-Americans) can feel particularly smug about it. This one is especially funny, though.

Christine O’Donnell has recently won the Republican nomination in Delaware for the upcoming election to the Senate. I just love her – for comic entertainment this woman is very good value. She makes Sarah Palin look like the most reasonable, well-informed, level-headed person around. Among many clangers that she has dropped in the past, the one that really got my attention was the following assertion, made during a debate on stem cells on The O’Reilly Factor show on Fox News …